Why Did My Credit Score Drop?

Dated: October 19 2020

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Why Did My Credit Score Drop?

If you’ve seen a change in your credit score recently, you may be wondering what prompted the change. There are a number of factors that contribute to a dropping credit score and it is important to know what may be causing that! When buying a home, it is important to maintain your credit and not make any major purchases that could impact your score. Here are the top 5 reasons for a drop in your credit:

 

YOU MADE A LATE PAYMENT

 

Accounting for about 30% of your total rating, your payment history has a big impact on your credit score. If you make a loan or credit card payment more than a month after the due date, it could cause your credit score to drop. A payment 60-90+ days late will have an even greater impact on your score.

 

YOU MADE A LARGE PURCHASE

 

Your credit utilization ratio can largely impact your credit score. Your ratio is how much of your credit you use in relation to your total available credit. The goal is to have a lower ratio so if you’ve been using more of your available credit lately, you may see a drop in your score. If for any reason your credit limit is lowered, it can impact your credit utilization ratio and that will impact your score.

 

AN ACCOUNT GOES TO COLLECTION

 

Timely payments on all accounts is an important part of your credit journey. Late payments on credit cards, loans, payments to doctors or medical facilities, student loans and utilities can be sent to a collection agency, which could in turn show up in your credit report.

 

YOU OPENED A NEW LINE OF CREDIT

 

When you apply for new credit, you are giving lenders the permission to access a copy of your credit report, which is known as a hard inquiry on your credit. If your credit report indicates that you’ve applied for multiple new credit lines in a short period of time, your credit score may be impacted.

 

YOU CLOSED A CREDIT LINE

 

Closing a card means losing available credit, which could increase your credit utilization ratio. As a result, your credit score may drop. If closing a card helps you stop spending, it may be a good idea. Otherwise, it is usually wise to keep lines of credit open.  The length of time you’ve had accounts open shows that you have a solid payment history, so that could be another reason to keep that card open that you’ve had awhile, especially if you are using it wisely!

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Sweet Magnolia Homes

Sweet Magnolia Homes brings a local knowledge to the markets we serve that has been obtained from years of living and working in Atlanta and the surrounding suburbs. This means our agents are intimate....

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